Lectures & Events

Why We Play: Sports, Drugs, and Meanings
Oliver C. Schroeder Jr. Scholar-in-Residence Lecture presented by the Law-Medicine Center
OCT 5, 2010
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Moot Courtroom (A59)

The controversy over elite athletes using anabolic steroids, growth hormone, and other performance enhancing drugs largely overlooks three crucial issues. First is the context of athletic competition, the forces that press athletes to consider using drugs, and the nearly universal desire among athletes for a level playing field. Second is the far larger community of amateur athletes including tens of millions of young people. Third are a set of disputes over the meanings of key concepts in sport: What is a level playing field and is it achievable or even desirable? What constitutes fairness in sport? Why does sport accept, even need, seemingly arbitrary limits on equipment and other rules? And, finally, what makes sport worthwhile, a meaningful human endeavor: In other words, why do we play?

Dr. Murray will take on issues of fairness and justice; social policy ideas like harm reduction strategies in drug policy; reflections on liberty, paternalism, and public health; off-label and non-therapeutic drug use, including use supervised or promoted by physicians.
Speaker Information
Thomas Murray, PhDThomas H. Murray, PhD
President and CEO
The Hastings Center

Thomas H. Murray is President and CEO of The Hastings Center. Dr. Murray was formerly the Director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics in the School of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University, where he was also the Susan E. Watson Professor of Bioethics. He serves on many editorial boards, has been president of the Society for Health and Human Values and of the
American Society for Bioethics and Humanities, and among other current posts serves as Chair of the Ethical Issues Review Panel for the World Anti-Doping Agency and as International Expert Advisor to Singapore�s Bioethics Advisory Committee. Dr. Murray has testified before many Congressional committees and is the author of more than 200 publications including The
Worth of a Child, The Cultures of Caregiving: Conflict and Common Ground among Families, Health Professionals and Policy Makers, edited with Carol Levine, and Genetic Ties and the Family: The Impact of Paternity Testing on Parents and Children, edited with Mark A. Rothstein, Gregory E. Kaebnick and Mary Anderlik Majumder, and most recently, Performance-Enhancing Technologies in Sports: Ethical, Conceptual, and Scientific Issues, edited with Karen J. Maschke and Angela A. Wasunna. He is also editor, with Maxwell J. Mehlman, of the Encyclopedia of Ethical, Legal and Policy Issues in Biotechnology. In January 2004 he received an honorary Doctor of Medicine degree from Uppsala University.
Additional Information
en to the public at no cost.

1.0 hour CLE credit will be available to lawyers who attend.
At one-hour CLE activities, Ohio Supreme Court regulations require attorneys to be present for the entire hour to obtain credit. Therefore, registration for one-hour lectures will close at the time the event is scheduled to start. Everyone is welcome to attend the lecture, but we cannot submit CLE credit for late arrivals.

At events longer than one hour, we will submit credit based on an attorney’s arrival time and duration of attendance, but no less than the minimum of one full hour of attendance.

We encourage attendees to arrive at registration 20 minutes prior to the start of a lecture to sign in, obtain materials, and be seated.

There is no law school parking, however, public parking, for a fee, is available in the Cleveland Botanical Garden parking underground garage. Also, meter parking might be available.

Supplemental Readings:
- Murray Bibliography
- Enhancement
- Gene Doping and Olympic Sport
- Sports Enhancement
- Athlete's Challenge

Recording in any form is prohibited.

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